Flipping, Wholesaling And Other Strategies With Luc Boiron

Flipping, Wholesaling And Other Strategies With Luc Boiron

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Georges El Masri 

Welcome to the Well Off Podcast where the goal is to motivate, inspire and share success principles. I'm here with Luke Boiron. So thank you for joining me.

 

Luc Boiron 

And thanks for having me.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, of course. And I think we'll just start off the usual way. So if you want to tell us a bit about your life story, before real estate so we can find out a bit, a bit more about you.

 

Luc Boiron 

Okay, well, Real Estate's always been a part of my life. I grew up in a real estate family. So yes, big family. My parents had six children. My father was a commercial real estate agent, and commercial real estate investor. So he did that for over 50 years in, in the Toronto area. And so I grew up, you know, learning about mortgages at the dinner table. It was a big part of my life. And I always wanted to get into real estate in some way I really tried to buy my first property was 15. It didn't work out. But I ended up buying my first property when I was 18.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, it's funny, we, I just said no real estate, we don't right, which is fine. I'm just messing with you. But yeah, go ahead.

 

Luc Boiron 

Outside of real estate then, even though I was doing real estate this whole time I spent a while. Or I spent eight years in university, I did my undergrad in business. I did my MBA joint with a law degree. Yeah. And then I article to actually took a ninth year to kind of intern at a law firm before I got called to the bar.

 

Georges El Masri 

Hmm. That's interesting. Because I know we were talking about this a little bit before, but you don't see a lot of lawyers leaving their profession, which they've put so much into, and then going to something crazy, like flipping and wholesaling. And doing all that why did you decide to do that? Is it because of your Dad and seeing the success that he had?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah, I think my Dad pushed me a lot into being an entrepreneur, he did push me to go to university to get an education, even though he wasn't University educated himself. But I think I just, I didn't enjoy how theoretical so much in law was, and it was a very practical kind of hands-on person. And then on top of that, I realized a lot of the best investors that you see a lot of them. A lot of the great ones you hear about that are, you know, developing cool projects, and they're doing beautiful custom homes. Many of them started doing a flip here and there, but very few of the good investors stay in the space. So I kind of always thought, once I realized flipping was possible in the GTA because I didn't think it was at first, I realized, very few people are sophisticated, and doing this consistently. So rather than doing one flip, saying, Okay, now let me go and do a house built. I said, Why don't I create a business around flipping volumes of houses, and be the best at it if possible.

 

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Georges El Masri 

Okay, well, you're obviously doing a good job. You've told me that you've worked on what over 30 this year or over 20 I think?

 

Luc Boiron 

I've done 20 or 21. So far this year, that's awesome.

 

Georges El Masri 

We'll talk about that a bit later. Can you tell us where you grew up?

 

Luc Boiron 

I grew up in Thornhill went to a French school downtown Toronto. public high school down in Thornhill and I stuck around. I mean, other than after high school, I spent two years teaching English in China. After that, I came back and went to undergrad law school MBA all at York University. So I kind of stayed in the Toronto area.

 

Georges El Masri 

Cool. Do your parents speak French?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yes. I grew up in a French-speaking household. Both your parents? Yes. But my parents immigrated from France.

 

Georges El Masri 

Oh, really? from France? Okay. Usually, because I went to a French school as well. Okay. never told you that. Which school did you go to?

 

Luc Boiron 

I went to Thornlea Secondary School in  Toronto.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay, got it. Yeah, that was at a high school.

 

Luc Boiron 

It was it actually went all the way from kindergarten through grade. 12.

 

Georges El Masri 

Cool. Yeah, I don't remember. I don't remember ever facing that school in any sports or anything.

 

Luc Boiron 

But it's good to have we had about 20 students per year ruin and we didn't really have any sports teams. So yeah, it's a long way to go from Thornhill. Isn't it? It was probably an hour. Do you know by TTC? Yeah. Good. Yeah. Interesting. Good choice for you. I guess it was worked out. And my parents wanted me to have like a French-speaking education though. I did go join you know, the English Standard public school system in grade 10 went to a high stone to Thornley secondary, in Thornhill.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay. Good to know. Yeah. So back to the real estate portion. Now. You end up leaving or you finish your law degree. You did your articling for two years you said?

 

Luc Boiron 

One year for one year? Yes. Okay.

 

Georges El Masri 

And then during that time period, you were starting to work on some real estate yourself. Can you tell us about what happened there?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah. So starting from the beginning, I, you know, when I was 18, I bought my first property is actually a rooming house at Jane and Finch. I held that for four years manage that did renovations on it myself learned to work with my hands learned about construction, learned, you know that I'm way too nice to tenants. Because I didn't have exactly the greatest tenants you can imagine. Yeah, but then I sold that first-year law school actually. I bought another property closer to York University student rental, bought another one with my good friend. And then with two friends. I bought a property up in Orillia a bungalow, converted that to a legal duplex. And I was always looking for opportunities, but, you know, I was always limited being a student and not being able to finance more purchases. So that was an issue. And then when I finished law school, I started articling, I was actually going to move down to California because I thought you couldn't flip in Canada. I thought price points are too high. Everyone sells to a realtor, there's no way to buy discounted properties. So I was convinced I was going to move to California, and I ended up not in part for my now wife, I stuck around. Yeah. So it was worth it. And I ended up article here, and I said, you know, I'm going to article here, I'm going to try to flip. And if I'm able to, I'll stick around. If I'm not, we're gonna move down to California. She was also articling at the same time, okay. And I did two flips, during my articling. And I made way more on those than I did articling. And so as soon as I got called to the bar, I quit law and said, I'm doing real estate full time. Cool.

 

Georges El Masri 

How did your family react to that? And you're your girlfriend, or now wife?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah. Supportive? For sure. I think I think they all see I'm way more passionate about real estate. Way more focused on it, and I'm good at it. So I don't think anyone was overly worried about me doing that.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, they all believed in you. They thought that if you do this, you're gonna be okay.

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah. And I've been doing it, like I said, with the rentals. At that point, you know, for nine years, probably no, eight. Yeah, something like that. So I think I kind of had shown that I was doing well, in real estate and real estate actually allowed me to graduate law school with positive net worth, rather than negative because of the debt. I had student loan debt that I was able to refinance out of most of my rentals pay off my student loan debt. And actually, then I was able to use that line of credit to purchase flips.

 

Georges El Masri 

That's awesome. Did you ever have a normal job?

 

Luc Boiron 

I mean, I grew up having jobs. I mean, I worked at a butcher shop, I mowed the lawn at a cemetery. I was always, you know, shovelling snow on winters and things like that. taught English in China, which isn't really a normal job. Most people don't teach English in China, Canadians at least. So I guess not completely normal. I mean, my are mowing the lawn of a cemetery. Yeah, I couldn't really count as normal, I'd say I guess so. For me, it was more normal than working for myself. The most normal would be my way article de article that the Canadian Investor Protection Fund. So it's a kind of securities-related law. And I would say that was a kind of a normal cubicle desk job. Mm-hmm.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. And to go back to something you mentioned, you said that your family and your now wife, they were very supportive when you told them what to change it was that something that was important to you, or you didn't care whether they said yes or no, they have your back or not, you were gonna do it anyway.

 

Luc Boiron 

I think I am pretty stubborn. So it would have mattered to me if they weren't supporting me. But it also wasn't like I just decided, the next day that I was going to, you know, I changed my mind and said, I'm not going to be a lawyer anymore. I'm gonna flip. Yeah, I, it was a while that I was planning to not stay in law. In fact, I articled knowing I wouldn't stay in law, but I wanted to get called to the bar to kind of follow through with what I had started. So the whole process was getting to the point of being called, but not to stay in it. And I think they knew that it was going to be my long term. Got it?

 

Georges El Masri 

And did your law degree help you in any way in your career today?

 

Luc Boiron 

I think it has, to a certain extent. It's helped me a little bit to project some more professionalism, but also even just interpreting things like zoning bylaws, reading contracts. They don't specifically train you on a lot of these things in law school, it's very theoretical. So for example, in contracts class, I never saw a contract. They teach you about cases from the 1800s that shaped our contract law. Yeah, so I can't say necessarily that, you know, it taught me the skills to review contracts, but at the same time, it helped me understand the background of certain things. So I'm dealing with the property now, where I'm severing it from a church owns it, and they bought the house beside it. And it's bringing back memories from my law school class about, you know, how properties merge on the title when you buy the neighbouring property, but there are exemption exceptions to it. For example, if the property is the whole of a lot in a plan of subdivision, then or it's previously had consent, then there are exemptions of where it doesn't merge on the title, and you can still transfer it. So that kind of thing. There are some memories that helped me out. And even just, you know, understanding contracts. So when I do a contract with the seller, I understand you know, you need to offer acceptance consideration for a contract to be binding. And so when I want a contract to be binding on the spot, and let's say they don't know yet who the lawyer, they're going to use us to hold the deposit. I'll give them $1 on the spot. And that dollar is a consideration, and it makes it a legally binding contract. Because until that deposit is paid, there's been no consideration and the contract is technically not found yet.

 

Georges El Masri 

So you just take out a loony or what?

 

Luc Boiron 

I take whatever I have, it's usually 5 or 10 dollar bill. Yeah, and I actually one time my whole deposit was $10. But another Time I gave him a $20 bill. And then in the clauses in the conditions and schedule a, it said that I am to provide an additional deposit of five or $10,000 to their lawyer, once they tell me who their lawyer is within two business days after they tell me in writing who their lawyer Yeah. So that way, they couldn't be looking for a lawyer and then decide, oh, I don't want to sell anymore. And you haven't given me a deposit yet. So it's not binding? Well, no, I gave you 20 bucks, we have no firm binding agreement. Technically, if I didn't give that additional deposit, I still have the right to close. I didn't breach you know that the contract is still binding, I breached a clause in it a condition but I didn't invalidate the contract. If I didn't give a deposit at all, the contract could be found not to be valid. So just basic principles like that. And don't take this as legal advice, because I'm not a practicing lawyer. Right. But, you know, just basic legal principles like that, that helped me understand, you know, how do I do this just a little bit better?

 

Georges El Masri 

And how do you prove that you actually gave them money? Do you take a picture of them with the $20 bill or something? What do you do?

 

Luc Boiron 

I write, you know, on the contract and the deposit place, I would write $20 cash and then write a receipt. Do you side? Yes, I did. And have them initial? Got it?

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, that makes sense. And okay, so your law is obviously helping you? And do you find that it has helped you become creative? In some ways with real estate? Or where does creativity come from? You're obviously you're flipping your wholesaling, you're doing things that not a lot of people do. And it does take some creativity to make deals work. Where does that come from?  Um, only a little bit from a legal background, because the law does not teach you to be creative, it in many ways teaches you to follow a specific path. But understanding the law, if you're a creative person, can help you figure out different ways to do things. while remaining on the right side of the law, I would say a lot of it came from my father, he, you know, as a commercial real estate agent, he was, you see a lot more creative things done, or different things are done in commercial contracts for purchases than residential. And so very few people bring that to the residential side. But you can put in all kinds of things in a commercial contract, you can do the same in a residential contract. You know, certain things like when I put in this is different if it's listed on the MLS, and it's going through a realtor. But when I put a clause that says I'm allowed to view the property, I don't say I'm allowed to view the property two more times before closing, I say I'm allowed to view the property from time to time with 24 hours notice before closing, so I don't know enough. Make sense? Things like that. When I put conditions in, I realized, Oh, I could put in an inspection condition, a financing condition, and you know, whatever else other conditions I want, and then all of these conditions are going to scare away a seller. Yeah. Why don't I just put in one condition, one due diligence, due diligence, or a typical one I use is partner approval. So that my partner's going to one of my partners will approve the purchase. And I have another partner. So you got many partners? Exactly. So if I don't get one that approves it, then that I have the right to back out. Right. And it gives me a lot of flexibility in deciding Well, this property isn't for me, I'm gonna back out of the deal.  Okay. So you just touched on partners? Are you working with a joint venture? Like, you're doing joint ventures? Are you talking about a different type of partnership, although the joint venture isn't legally a partnership, but yeah.

 

Luc Boiron 

No, but I guess you could loosely classify that as a part. Yeah. So I've done some joint ventures, it could also be a lender, so private money lender who's going to lend on the first mortgage, I would consider that person a partner. So if I can't find a private lender who wants to lend on the property, my partner didn't approve it. So I've partnered with people for the equity portion. And I've also partnered people for the kind of the initial purchase the debt.

 

Georges El Masri 

With your private money lenders, do you have people that have to go 100% loan to value? Or do you always have to put in some money like 20%, or whatever?

 

Luc Boiron 

It depends on how I do it, and I'm in a little bit different, let's say a better position now than when I started. When I started, I had enough money maybe to do you know, one deal at a time myself. So when I wanted to do more, I would bring in a private lender, usually to lend 80% loan to value on the purchase. But then I would also bring in a partner to fund the rest of the downpayment, the closing costs on the renovations, so I wouldn't have any money in the deal. Yeah. And the value I would add was bringing the deal and seeing it through completion. And of course, personal guarantees. So it's not like, you know, I'm just gonna walk from the deal or anything like that. But that was, I was able to do a lot of deals without actually thinking of it as a no money down deal. But providing opportunities for people to get in on those deals with me. I was doing that.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, it is a joint venture in a way maybe not legally, but he does pretty much what you're doing.

 

Luc Boiron 

Well, and it might even be an illegal joint venture, right. I called them a partner, but they're, it's a joint venture where they're putting up the equity. So that's true. Yeah.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay, so before we continue on this topic, just in case people don't know what we're talking about, can you explain the major things that you do wholesale, wholesaling, and flipping?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yes. So I think most people understand what a flip is. It's basically, you buy a property usually rundown, you fix it up, you make a beautiful like on HGTV, and then you sell it to a retail buyer on the MLS that's a flip. To do that in our market, it's very difficult, you'd have to buy a property at a significant discount. Yeah. So another option is when you are buying a property at a significant discount is to wholesale a property, which is you buy a property. So basically you put it under contract. Now you have a beneficial interest illegal interest in that property, even though you're not on title, instead of closing on the property and then fixing it up and selling it, you can sell your contract your beneficial interest in this property, you can sell it to another investor. So if I buy a property that's worth a million dollars, but I buy for 500,000, pretty sure there's someone out there who pay me 600,000 for that contract.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, for sure.

 

Luc Boiron 

And I never have to close on it. I don't have commissions, I don't have land transfer tax financing costs. I never closed on the property, I just transfer the contract. And the third thing I do is what I call whole tailing, which is a wholesale to the retail market. And that would be similar to the wholesale where I buy the property under the market. Even if it's quite rundown, I basically do very little to it, maybe clean it, clean it up, throw it some junk, maybe paint it, and then I sell it to a retail buyer on the MLS. And part of the reason is a lot of the retail buyers as flippers or landlords that they're willing to pay more than I could pay as a flipper on the MLS. So I can just put that on the MLS even if I buy a property for, you know that same example, it's a million, it's worth a million dollars as is, but I buy it for 500,000. Okay, I close on the property, I sell it on the MLS for a million dollars, because that's what it's worth as is. And now I have to pay closing costs, financing, realtor commissions, but I make that spread from having bought it at a discount. What you'll notice in all of these three things is the only way to make these things work is if you buy really cheap. So I'd like I like to think of myself as one of the best buyers of real estate in Ontario. And that's what I do for a living. I buy real estate. These three things I do flipping wholesaling, the whole tailing. These are my exit strategies. Yeah. But the main thing is, can I buy it cheap enough? Where I can have any of these options?

 

Georges El Masri 

Right? And just to clarify, you are not a real estate agent, you're not licensed as a realtor?

 

Luc Boiron 

No, I'm not a real estate. Exactly.

 

Georges El Masri 

Alright, so if we want to get into a bit more detail, when we're talking about, let's say a flip, or actually, let's say if you want to wholesale or whole tale even is there, what is your goal as an investor? What are you looking for? Are you looking for a specific ROI? Or is there something else that another criterion that works for you?

 

Luc Boiron 

So my criteria aren't set in stone, I aim for 10% of the purchase price and profit. So if I'm buying a property for 400,000, and it's a relatively cosmetic run on which I consider, you know, new kitchen, new bathrooms, new floors, new light fixtures, kind of redo the whole house cosmetically, but not the 100-year-old house that I have to get to the studs. So I buy it for 400,000 I want to make at least 440 thousand in profit, okay, potentially with a partner. But after all debt payments, I want to make at least 40,000 in profit 10%. Now that doesn't work, I'm buying a lot of properties that are at lower price points. If I'm buying a property for $100,000, I'm not going to try to do that for a $10,000 profit. So I can have a minimum of let's say 25,000 on a deal. Okay.

 

Georges El Masri 

So 10% of the after the repair purchase price of the purchase price, yes. Okay, got it. 10%. And does that include your taxes? And by the way, are you paying a capital gains tax on that? Or is it considered taxable income?

 

Luc Boiron 

It's considered taxable income. Now I flipped through a corporation. And unlike rental income, where it's passive income, it's taxed at a higher amount, I get taxed as active business income. So for 2018 active business income is 13 and a half percent, okay. at the corporate level, obviously, when I pull that out, I get taxed again, partially taxed again. So it comes out to about the same thing when you pull it out of the corporation. But when you leave it in only be taxed 13 and a half percent allows you to continue recycling, that money can grow year over year without being hit too hard.

 

Georges El Masri 

That's a pretty good, pretty good rate. Yeah, yeah. All right. And are you using one corporation for all your flips? Are you separating them just in case something happens? You don't want your assets to be at risk?

 

Luc Boiron 

I have two corporations, the majority are done is done through one Corporation?

 

Georges El Masri 

And are you writing your offers in the name of a corporation and then assigning it to your other Corporation before closing?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah, most of my offers, initially will be written under one Corporation. Yep. And then whether I sign it to someone else, close under my personal name close on another Corporation. Yeah, close under my wife's name, all of those things. I have an assignment clause in the agreement that allows me to assign it to someone else, right.

 

Georges El Masri 

I've heard that in Ontario. You don't need an assignment clause to sign deals. You have the right to do that.

 

Luc Boiron 

I completely agree with you and legally don't need it. However, if you don't have it in people will give you a harder time where I'm doing it. Even the other side's lawyer technically, they should understand that you don't need it. Yeah. But they say well you assigned it but there's no other than that you have no right to assign the wrong but it's just waiting easier and cleaner. Yeah. Unless someone's giving you resistance. Yeah. If someone's really giving you resistance over the wording, there are two different things I do. One would be don't put an assignment clause in at all, and then assign it anyways. Because you're allowed to, as long as there's nothing saying, hey, you're not allowed assigning. Yeah, the other option, some people are scared of the word assignment. So I have a clause I use that says, the buyer is allowed to change the buyer's name. Okay, very simple, plain English, not legal ease. But it's so easy for someone to understand that. And people don't have a concern over that. The difference would be my typical assignment clause relieves me of liability once I've assigned it. Yeah. So that sometimes what people have a problem with.

 

Georges El Masri 

They'll scratch that out maybe or something?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yes. So sometimes I may have to take out that part that relieves me a liability, and then be much more careful if I'm assigning it to someone, or how I'm closing on it, making sure that it's gonna happen because I remain liable.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, because if you assign it to someone, and they can't close, now, the seller can pursue you.

 

Luc Boiron 

Yes, yeah. And another way to protect yourself from that is getting really good deals because they can only pursue you if they realize a loss. So if I buy a property for 200,000, and I can't go through with it, this has never happened. But if I can't go through with it, I don't close. And then they go, and they sell for 300,000. They can I get my deposit back, and they can't come after me for anything, because they got more money, right? So buying a really good deal helps you from, you know, if anything like that happens, yeah, for sure.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay, so if we just want to go into a bit of the detail here of a wholesale deal, you find something for 200,000. Let's say you assign it to another purchaser or an investor for 250. Now that purchaser has to come up with 50 grand, in addition to the deposit down payment, whatever else is required to give to you correctly.

 

Luc Boiron 

Now, that's it will depend on the lender, but almost all the time, the lenders will only finance based on the initial purchase so that 200,000 instead of 250,000.

 

Georges El Masri 

Right? Is there a way to work around that legally, to ensure that in case the investor doesn't have an additional 50 to pay you?

 

Luc Boiron 

You could potentially work with the seller, where they would build it in and then they would pay me. But the way the deals are done, it usually wouldn't work that way. If it's a good deal, and let's say I'm getting a good price, we could potentially if it's a flip, I could potentially be paid on the back end when the person buying from me sells it in, you know, three months, six months, obviously, the price needs to reflect that. But they could pay me on the back end. So they don't need to come up with that cash.

 

Georges El Masri 

How do you do that you like say get a piece of the equity firm when it's sold? Or do maybe just say I want to fixed amount?

 

Luc Boiron 

It's usually a fixed amount. But what I mean is, if it's a fixed amount, let's say $20,000. If someone was let's say, I don't have any other buyers, yeah, and they're interested at 20,000, then I could say, okay, pay me 20,000, once you sell it, assuming there's a flip that it's gonna be short term, or within six months pay me the 20,000. So it doesn't need to be immediately and it wouldn't take usually wouldn't take a percentage it would be, you know, a fixed amount.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. So as you mentioned, you're usually finding really good deals. And that's why it's it's attractive to investors. But at this point, I can understand maybe in the past, why you would assign these deals. But why wouldn't you just close on all of these deals yourself and then just sell them for a profit?

 

Luc Boiron 

That's a good question. Part of it is the volume of deals I'm doing. Like I said, I'm at 20 or 21. So far this year, yeah, I can't handle that many renovations. In fact, I have too many renovations going on right now. Right, it takes a lot of time. And I do want to grow, I have plans to expand into a lot more volume. The other thing too, is some of the properties I'm buying, for example, may not work as a great flip. So if I can't get good financing on a rental, let's say find a great four Plex. Now it's only it's $400,000. And it's worth 450. I may not be able to close on that renovate the units and resell it at enough of a spread, there may not be enough spread there. But I could ask for 20 and someone who's looking for a four Plex. Now, these are rare, but someone who's looking for a four Plex would love to get a $450,000 four Plex for 420,000. Yeah. Whereas for me to flip that, I might need to be buying it at 380. So there are certain situations where I know, you know, there's a good pool of people who want rentals in this area, and a 20 3040 $50,000 discount would be appealing to them, then that property would be better to wholesale to a landlord buyer. And they'll be happy renting it out, but they're getting better financing and they're holding it for the long term. Whereas I'm just kind of finding the deal, right?

 

Georges El Masri 

I guess it depends on the deal with or it depends on what the investor plans on doing if they're gonna flip or maybe they're doing a binding hold. That might change the results.

 

Luc Boiron 

Absolutely. And also the distance. So I may not want to take on large projects in Windsor Sania, Ottawa.

 

Georges El Masri 

How are you finding deals out there?

 

Luc Boiron 

Well, I haven't done any Windsor. Certainly, I've done. I am working on my second one in St. Thomas. Done one in London. Several in Brantford. I did one in Westport. Ontario, which is 40 minutes north of Kingston. So certain ones are targeted mailings, certain ones are online. The one in Westport was actually through another wholesaler who found it. And, you know, kind of said, Who's crazy enough to buy out in this small town? I said, Hey if the price is right, I'll pay anywhere. Yeah. So I am looking everywhere.

 

Georges El Masri 

Got it. All right, two questions for you. Who are your wholesale client's wholesale ease? And also, where are you finding your deals?

 

Luc Boiron 

So, my clients, I used to be the buyers. For me, I have a mix on my buyer's list. And it's good because certain people will be looking for specific things in specific markets, certain ones will be looking everywhere. So for flip deals, I find if it's a good enough price to flip, there's a lot of people who want a good flip property.

 

Georges El Masri 

How are you finding them? These people, by the way.

 

Luc Boiron 

I mixed things through meetups through introductions. And also I was doing some Facebook ads for a while. Basically saying, Hey, you know, join my buyer's list. If you're looking for discounted properties. A lot of people were like, oh, you're a scam? Why would anyone sell it for a discount? But? I mean, it was kind of amusing to me. Yeah. But yeah, I've got grown, my buyers. Let's do that. Nope. Because of Facebook marketing. I don't really know a lot of the buyers on my list.

 

Georges El Masri 

There's so many it was effective for you the Facebook marketing? Or has there been something that's more effective? Like, let's say networking at some of these small groups that you're a part of?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah, I might have. I'm trying to think of maybe 300 people on my list. I'm trying to think of how many people probably something like that. I probably have five or 10 really serious buyers? They have a great deal. Yeah, they'll buy it always. So and then, you know, within the rest of those, there's a mix of people who will buy in the right market, you know, with the right numbers, type of property. So people who have specific, let's say, you know, I buy duplexes that can be converted to triplexes in Kitchener. Yeah, and that's all they're looking for. If I happen to find one, the perfect person to do it, those are rare. Yeah. So most likely, they're not going to get what they want from my buyer's list, but there's a chance and if that comes up, they're going to get the right property for them. So overall, I would say it has worked, finding people, but really getting to know the people who are doing this volume are the best ones too, to wholesale too and sometimes they have short timelines, the wholesale deals I get. So to be able to call someone I know is serious, I know is looking at another deal right now and say, Hey, I got this property closing in two weeks. You know, I need a decision by tomorrow. Can you know, are you interested based on these numbers? That that goes a long way. Yeah.

 

Georges El Masri 

And the second part of the question, how are you finding your deals your house deals? Yes.

 

Luc Boiron 

So I didn't mention I am growing this as a business. So I have a team. I have an acquisitions manager and kind of admin slash transaction coordinator on my team, now. And so I do a lot of outbound marketing. And that's flyers letters, targeted, you know, mail campaigns, as well as broad mail campaigns, ad words, Google, Kijiji, Bing, everything, just kind of broad marketing. And what happens is, I then have sellers calling my acquisitions manager. So he gets the calls directly from the sellers and then determines how motivated they are determined, you know if they're willing to take the kind of the right price. And if it's worth it, you'll go and see the properties and negotiate with them and then make an offer. So I'll basically my role would be to review, once he gets the point where he's making an offer to make sure that his assumptions are correct on the exit price review comparables and things like that, and the renovation budget and then design the offers. So a lot of outbound marketing brings in a decent amount of calls. And we probably buy one or two houses for every hundred phone calls we get.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. And you're getting, you said you were getting 100 every How often?

 

Luc Boiron 

Probably getting a little over 100 a month, I would say 100 a month for buying two or three houses a month. Yeah. Right.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay, so you're doing, you're doing all this stuff. You said it's very broad. There's print marketing, there's online ads, all sorts of stuff. Have you done any studies to see what has been the most effective source of, I guess, lead generation for you?

 

Luc Boiron 

The best ones are my long term SEO. Basically, my websites, the longer they've been up, the better I have organic results, right? Not the paid ones. The paid ones are good too. But probably I would say the best bang for your buck is when you have a website with the right keyword search the right search engine optimization. With time you have people who organically find your website, and those actually end up being your best usually my best deals.

 

Georges El Masri 

So these are just people who own a house, let's say maybe it's distressed, and they're just googling house buyer or something and they end up on your website.

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah, I have two websites for house sellers. I buy houses toronto.ca Okay, and cash house buyer.ca and I kind of used them in different marketing because the I buy houses toronto.ca is more focused on the immediate GTA cash house buyers focused a little more broadly, since it doesn't have Toronto in the But yeah, so people might Google, you know, sell my house fast sell my house without a realtor fast cash for my house. Yeah, they might see a bandit sign on the street sign that says we buy houses. Yeah. So you might Google we buy houses, then they might find my website. Even that bandit sign might not be mine didn't catch the phone number they caught we buy houses. So instead of searching who will buy my house, they're searching. We buy houses to find those companies that do that, right that they would find my website from that.

 

Georges El Masri 

And obviously, you've got a lot of marketing in Toronto, it sounds like are most of your deals in Toronto, the ones that you're wholesaling, and flipping and all that.

 

Luc Boiron 

No, most of my deals are at the moment, a lot on the west side. So I've got some heavy marketing, mail marketing in Brantford. So I'm doing well there just because of the heavy market and we're getting a decent amount of leads from that in just a little while. I just came from seeing one this morning in St. Catharines that I'd bought. Part of my acquisition manager had bought over the weekend, I believe. So I saw that. bought one in Hamilton closing soon in November, just closed on an on one that I'm keeping as a rental in Brantford, I have another one I'm dealing with him, purchased in Brantford. That was the church house with the severance. I'm closing on to this week in Toronto, so one in a typical one in downtown. So the thing is what Toronto wants to do, I find it very, very difficult to get deals done in Toronto, because of the high price point expensive financing the double and transfer tax. You know, even realtor commissions on the sale, it's going to be a large amount of money because it's such a high price point. The difference is when I do occasionally find deals in Toronto, the potential profit is much larger. So you know, the one in Etobicoke I think I might make. I'm hoping to make 150,000 on that flow. It's awesome. Whereas I got an amazing deal in St. Catharines. The one I saw this morning, I bought a really really rundown house with holes through the walls from rats for 106,500

 

Georges El Masri 

Wow,

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah. So awesome. It's probably worth 160 as is. And if I close on it and clean it up a little I might make $40,000 which is great on this price point of the property. But it doesn't compare to 150,000 in Toronto. Right. So the lower price points. I do like the lower price points anyway because it feels so much less risky. Right? And there are always people who want to buy it the starter home price points. My most expensive flip I'm doing right now I hope to sell it for a little over 1.5 million. And that one has to be a lot more stressed. Because of a 10% fluctuation in prices in the run sales area that will really hurt.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, it's gonna impact your ROI quite a bit. Yes. Yeah. 1.5 million is in Toronto. Yes, it's a single-family home. It's a detached, semi-detached, wow.

 

Luc Boiron 

Yes.

 

Georges El Masri 

1.5 semi. And that's so that you're expecting that's what you're going to sell it for. And that's not what you bought it for?

 

Luc Boiron 

No, I bought it for 1.1. But it was actually a joint venture because only the max I was willing to pay for it was 1,000,050. And the seller is a builder who builds you know, larger mid-sized projects and mid-sized condos and rental apartments. So this was kind of a side thing he was doing to keep the cash flow going because the projects he does take so long, and then decided he didn't want to really finish it. So he had already made money, he got a good buy. So what I said to him, the relatively sophisticated guy said, if he wasn't willing to go under one point, when I say okay, I'll pay 1.1. But you stay on the title. And that way, I'll pay your financing costs, which was a great bank loan, you know, 2.95% or something like that. I don't pay a land transfer tax, I save $35,000 online transfer tax. So between those two already, I've saved money. So it's we basically did a joint venture agreement, he's getting 1.1 million when I sell it to the end buyer. Okay, he's staying on the title and saving me all of those transfer costs. And yeah, and all of that.

 

Georges El Masri 

And you're doing some work to the house or it's you're leaving it as?

 

Luc Boiron 

It's almost it's probably a $200,000 reno. Really? Yes, it's a century home, got it to the studs, everything needs to be done.

 

Georges El Masri 

And how does insurance work for that purpose? So is he gonna he's the one who gets the insurance?

 

Luc Boiron 

He has kept his insurance on it and making the payments. So he has a builder's risk policy on it.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay, so you're paying that now and you're basically paying everything and everything on it.

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah, like he had sold it to me, etc. He doesn't get really the profit or the capital back, other than a deposit that I had released to him. He doesn't get that until I close. We sell to the end buyer. That's a smart idea. Where did you come up with that strategy? I've done it. I think this is the third one I've done. It's similar to the concept of the agreement for sale, which I've never done and I don't fully understand. I've just heard of it being done in Ontario. The first one I think I'm trying to think I don't know where I came up with that idea. I wonder if it was suggested by my father. The first one I did was with one of my good friends who was moving out of the country and he wanted a certain price but after realtor commissions, I could pay to subtract the realtor commissions if you would hang on to it and pay that price without him having to you know prep it for sale. So we agreed. He held it sold it to the end buyer for me after I renovated it and I did quite well on it in part because the market was going up at the time and he was happy with the sale so worked out for everyone and I trusted him so it's Great first Yeah, deal to do like that. This one with the builder. I know he's a sophisticated guy with a reputation. At the same time, we have a joint venture agreement with the kind protect both parties. So it is risky, even though he might have an agreement to protect you. It's still a risky proposition with the seller that you don't trust or no very well. Yeah. Because they are on title. Right? Do you run what if they sell it? Yes. To someone behind your back? Yes, you can sue them, you can, you know, yeah, it's just more complicated and risky. So you really want to feel that the person you're dealing with is an honest person. Even if you might legally be in the right, it can still be complicated and frustrating. If you can't trust the person.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, definitely don't want anything going to court, if possible, know for sure. What's your idea of financial freedom? What does that mean to you?

 

Luc Boiron 

So the vision I have in my head, and that I'm working towards always is my wife and I moved into the Canary Islands and spending the winters there, I'm still young, we're still young, we don't have kids yet, probably in the next few years, we will have children. So things will change when we have children. But I'd like to be starting to spend parts of my winters and then all of my winters in the Canary Islands, within a few years. And financial freedom to me, and I think the most is not needing to work, choosing to work by choice, but not need to, and the rental properties that I've got a portfolio building up of cash flowing rental properties, that kind of help with that, where I can live off of that income and be comfortable. At the same time, my wife has a great job. So she won't be leaving that unless we have a very, you know, stable portfolio that is very safe. And we know it's going to be protecting our long term. At the same time, things are changing a little because I'm trying to build a business here that will continue running, even if I'm not around. So basically, my version of financial freedom may not be completely early retirement, but it's, you know, spending an hour a day on checking my emails from the Canary Islands in the winter, and keeping a business running with a business manager here in Toronto, and live to be able to live comfortably off of that and continue adding to my portfolio. Cool.

 

Georges El Masri 

Sounds pretty good.

 

 

Well, I hope so. I mean, it's, I need to put it out there, I gotta put my goals out there my dreams out there. Because if I don't put it out there, it's easy not to, you know, be committed to it?

 

Georges El Masri 

And how far are you from hiring a business manager and having the business essentially run itself?

 

Luc Boiron 

I mean, I could do it at any time. But I'd be giving up a good product. So it's really something I would want to do. Maybe it would, the business manager would be someone from within my company, as I grow, I do have plans to grow and hire a few more people within the next year. So I want to grow the company to a certain size that it can more justify having a full-time manager of it. And that I can kind of just guide it from above the manager if that makes sense.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. And throughout the process of finding a good deal, you come across all these different properties. How do you decide which ones you want to wholesale flip? Or keep?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah, I'm having that debate right now. The one in St. Catherine. So just talking about, I could wholesale. In fact, I bought it for 106 500 I have someone offering me, you know, a $10,000 wholesale fee. So let's say 116,500. So I know, I could just sign that today. And someone would give me $10,000. That's great. But I also have to look at the numbers of you know, does it make sense to put a little bit of more work into it, or close on it and resell? I think there's enough to spread there. And the price point is low enough, it's easy to find the money that it's worth closing on, and at least wholesaling. So close on it empty at the junk, kill the rats, and, and put it on the market. But I also look at Can I get a little bit more than that? Is it worth getting doing a little more work to get more than that? So if I can sell it for, let's say 160 doing nothing. And I can spend 10 grand and sell it for 180? That might be worth it. But I'll also look at how far is it? So how easy is it for me to find a contractor that I can count on not have to drive really long distances to monitor a $10,000 renovation. So all of these things I take into account. For example, if it was a century home, not close to me that have to get to the studs to all new, you know electrical because there's not been to Calverton, new plumbing because there are galvanized plumbing and remove all the lath and plaster that's a huge renovation project would take a ton of my time to manage. So if I was going to do that, I'd have to make way more profit. Yeah. Then if I could just wholesale it to someone who would take that on. Right. And I would make you know if I made $20,000 less by wholesaling it. You know, very, very happy to hear that.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. You only have so much time.

 

Luc Boiron 

Absolutely.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay, when you're buying these properties, are you most of the time using private money? Are you qualifying yourself? or How are you structuring it the financing?

 

Luc Boiron 

So if you tell a bank that you're flipping a property, they won't lend on it? They don't know banks, as far as I know, no banks are alternative lenders lend flips, and if anyone you know in your audience knows of an alternative lender, who would consider lending on flips I'd be happy to I mean, I have the business income, I have excellent credit, but they won't touch these properties, right. So my, my solution is either partner with people or borrow the money through private mortgages, which is often through mortgage investment companies as well through a broker. So sometimes it's individuals who do the private sometimes it's through brokers. And so the more expensive properties pretty much always need to get, you know, an 80-75 80% loan to value the first mortgage through a private lender, or MIC. And to make the mortgage investment company, so it's basically a pool of people's money, and they lend it out on private mortgages. And I believe the people who lend the money to the company get the interest rate that you're paying, and then the MC, like the people who run the MC and the fees, they charge, you know, fees can be substantial. So they like charging me fees because I turn over the money quickly, and they make a lot on the fees. It's great for them, not for me, yeah. So we had that. And then I also partner with some people for these lower pricepoint properties. Again, I keep coming back to this one in St. Catharines. But got one coming up in Hamilton I bought for 130,000, the one in Brantford 440,000, I can either easily find private into individuals who have you know, 100 $240,000 to put down on a property or to buy a property with and they can either lend on it or potentially partner on it, depending on how the deal works. So those lower pricepoint properties are really much easier to find people with money to lend on by buying an $800,000 property. I'm not going to find someone to put down $800,000 Yeah, it's Well, I mean, I guess it's possible, but I don't have anyone like that in my network who's willing to lend those properties.

 

Georges El Masri 

So what do you do you go to your MIC, I guess I go to the MIC?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah, or through a broker might find some high net worth individuals will lend on those. I can get charged fees through the broker. Yep. And, and then I still need to come up with the down payment and reno cost, which may be for my own funds may be partnering with someone or maybe otherwise outside borrowing, not secured. Unlike traditional banks, who say you can't borrow the downpayment, the private lenders don't really care where the downpayment comes from, they have the security in the property. Yeah. And their high rate. So, you know, I could say, George, hey, you know, I'll pay 10% to lend me 100,000 for the down payment on this property. And so I can do that as well. And that, you know, assuming you'd be willing to do that unsecured because I can't register another second app for them, not to mention the costs of registering the second. So you could lend me that hundred thousand dollars, I use that as my down payment, I pay you back with interest, and I pay back the MC with interest at the sale.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay, so you end up not putting any of your own money in the deal.

 

Luc Boiron 

Sometimes, I don't necessarily set out trying to do deals with none of my own money. It just kind of makes sense. Depending on where my money is, at the time, how many deals I have tied up in. And you know, the availability of other investors who want to lend on my deals.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. Okay. So just to recap, you would get a private first, and then you would get an unsecured loan to cover the down payment for that private first. Yes. Would it be through the MC that you would get that money?

 

Luc Boiron 

No. So that might be you know, the MCs won't do the unsecured loans. Okay. Is there security against Real Estate? Always? Hence, the name mortgage investment company that Yeah, secured against the property? No. So that would be from private individuals. And again, we're talking about, you know, not $800,000 because we're just talking about the downpayment portion. Yeah, $100,000, still a big, big chunk. Yeah. And I've done many deals with none of my own money, where the, you know, either a lender or a partner will put in the downpayment, put in the renovations and the closing costs. And I've done many deals with my own money. So 10 of a mix. Okay, cool. That's pretty interesting. I've never thought about doing it that way. It makes a lot of sense. Yeah. Yeah. Okay.

 

Georges El Masri 

So I want to ask you a specific question while you were talking, but I actually forgot what it was now. That's what happens. I talk a lot. So I kept going after you forgot your question. No, that's okay. Okay, so what do you see as the future for yourself? What direction? Is your business going in? Are you going to continue doing what you're doing? Or are you going to shift over to maybe a different strategy or something, something else?

 

Luc Boiron 

As I mentioned, I see myself as a house buyer, and that's my strength. That's what I'm best at. That's what I want to keep doing. And I've got certain strategies and systems and processes that work for me. And I think I can grow to do that. As I mentioned, a lot of people who are really good at this business, they go, Well, I'm really good at this. Let me go develop a townhouse complex, right, or, you know, get land to rezone. They get into more complicated, different deals, very few people do the volume that I'm doing. And I want to grow I actually have a goal to do 50 houses next year. So that is where I see myself going. I see myself expanding further and further from the GTA, increasing my marketing and having more people on my acquisitions team to go and meet with the sellers.

 

Georges El Masri 

How many deals Do you do last year just to see the growth?

 

Luc Boiron 

Last year I did either 17 or 18

 

Georges El Masri 

18 years already surpassed that? So

 

 

yes, I did. So 2016 I did two, really and then 2017 eight, it's 17 or 18. And this year, I'm at 22. Or 21. So if I hit you know, I don't know how it'll be until the end of the year. Did you hit 25? Did you have another job in 2016? I did. So 2016, March 2016 was my first flip. And that was during my articling. And I got called to the bar in September of 26. Okay. Yeah, it was really only in October 2016. I started doing real estate. Oh, cool. Yeah, full time at least. Oh, yeah. Great. Okay.

 

Georges El Masri 

So you envision growth, spreading out that further, doing more deals doing 50? So even double what you're doing now? Yes. And do you have a plan in place to do that?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yes, that the main thing is I need to grow my team. So I have a general idea of what marketing works for me. And I have kind of a plan on expanding the marketing because in part of the geographic expansion is that you certain marketing gets saturated. When you do too much of it, you know, you can do Kijiji ads, but only so many people will look at Kijiji, and you kind of saturate that market. But if you expand into a new market, you can do the same things and grow. Grow that so but the main thing is hiring people because my acquisitions manager is, is maxed out on the number on the volume of calls he can take. So I can't increase my marketing too much. But I can't, at the moment I'm at my marketing is maxed out for what he can handle, right? I would hire someone today too, you know, work with my acquisitions manager who's great and doing a good job. I would hire someone today, except that I know there's a slowdown through the winter, you know, we're recording this in October, I'm expecting a bit of a slowdown in, it's harder to buy through the winter, fewer people are looking to sell. So I don't want to hire someone now and then have a reduced number of calls for multiple people. My plan is to hire another person in the spring, wrap up my marketing the springtime when more people are looking to sell, typically how I've seen in my business, more people are calling in the springtime. So I'll be able to ramp up my marketing and have more than one person taking those circles.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, but the thing is, from what I know, when the spring hits, and it's busy, you're not going to have time to hire someone. So it's probably better for you to start preparing for that maybe one or two months before, even though it might be a little bit slower. But at least you know that you've got some free time at that point. Absolutely. I was thinking of starting to look for someone in January. Yeah. to maybe start in February. Yeah, exactly. Because you're probably gonna get swamped. If you're doing 50 deals next year. Yeah, your springs gonna be swamped.

 

Luc Boiron 

I don't think I can do 50 deals with my team the way it is.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, yeah, it's a matter of hiring more people to be able to handle that. Well, yeah. When is the busiest time for your busiest time of the year?

 

Luc Boiron 

It's funny because you see the market pick up in the spring, but you're my volume doesn't pick up immediately when that point as I start getting more calls, but kind of take some time to fill the pipeline and talk to those people who are interested in selling. So I would say late spring, to the beginning of summer, up to I mean, right now I'm extremely busy still in October. So we'll see if sellers stop contacting us, I'm not sure when it will be. But let's say late spring to November, December will probably be my busiest time.

 

Georges El Masri 

It's really cool that you're getting 100 calls a month, you're going nuts, it's really hard to be able to do that. Because I've done a bit of stuff as you know, just listed postcards or just sold and tried, you know, the real estate stuff, but I don't really get much of a response through print. And I know you have to constantly put your name out there and people have to see it all the time. Do you find that? Because you're always putting new content with the same sort of marketing that you're getting a response? Or is it you can just go into a brand new market and you're still gonna get a good response.

 

Luc Boiron 

Hitting them repeatedly does help. So when they make them think about it the first time you hit them again, you remind them but there's also a difference in what I do in realtors have kind of saturated the market people are so used to seeing realtor postcards. Yeah. Unless they're really thinking of selling right then and they don't have a realtor. Otherwise, they're just your postcards going in. Exactly, exactly. Whereas mine is a little bit different. And people aren't used to seeing it. So it helps that way. You have to realize 200 phone calls. We have lots of people who say oh, I'm my property is listed right now and it hasn't been selling Oh, yeah. You know, do you want to pay me you know, I'll lower my price by $5,000 off of the asking price. Will you buy it? Well, no, you know, that's not if you can't sell it for what you're asking on the MLS within five grand there's no way that's going to work for me.

 

Georges El Masri 

I guess it's worth a shot for them, but not a very good strategy. Exactly.

 

Luc Boiron 

They you can kind of see that they're, you know, getting ready to sell but it makes it so much harder once they already have a realtor. Yeah, so they already have to pay commissions on the sale. So they're not saying that it's one of the value proposition with me is they don't need to pay realtor commissions. They save that they don't need to clean it up like the one in St Catharines they can leave the furniture they don't want they're just gonna leave the junk behind and we'll take care of it.

 

Georges El Masri 

Right. But that's what's going to be pretty expensive, won't it get a dumpster and then we will I mean it depends on the purchase price. Obviously, you're aiming for one or six. So it's not bad but,  It absolutely reflects the purchase price. So I mean, I could probably call one 800 got junk and spend 1200 bucks to throw it their furniture. It's not going to be A huge amount of money compared to the right, the savings on an on a That's true. You're taking it off the top. They're paying for it basically. Yeah, by leaving all their crap in their sort of cleaning it up. Because all they have to do really is just clean it out. Put it on the market, it'll sell it even if they put it on the market as is it would probably sell for significantly more.

 

Luc Boiron 

And some people I mean, don't necessarily believe they can sell a house. Yeah, with a rat problem. Right. But flippers on the MLS will probably pay too much for it. Yeah.

 

Georges El Masri 

Have you ever seen rats in properties?

 

Luc Boiron 

No, that's probably the first one I run it I've run into with rats. Whites and I just came from it before this. Oh, yeah. Yeah, I saw it this morning. I didn't see any rats there. But there are literally holes in the walls where they chewed through. Yeah, I've mice are common. You know, most droppings that's common run into cockroaches and things like that. I haven't been in any flea infestations any bedbug infestations.

 

Georges El Masri 

You know you don't know that. But I know how to take your close. Yeah. Well, I try to be if I come through from a really gross house, I try to be careful. Yeah, you got to cut yourself down. You gotta Yeah before you get in the car pat yourself done

 

Luc Boiron 

If I brought fleas or bedbugs home. Oh, man.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. Yeah, I remember I went into an apartment building in Hamilton a few months ago. Yeah. And I just, they were showing me around the open one of the doors and I look and I just see mice running around in the rain in the middle of the spot. They're not even hiding. Yeah, just right there. Yeah, yeah. That can be taken care of. No. Yeah, too much money. It just wasn't showing its apartment building was infested. Right. Yeah. So mice, so it helps a lot when it's empty. When you're Yeah, renovations. Yeah, for sure. Okay, great. Let's go into the random five. Okay. Just gonna ask you five questions, and then you can just right off the top of your head. Tell me what comes to mind first. Okay, we'll start with an easy one.  What's your favourite cereal? Oh.

 

Luc Boiron 

I'm gonna say, Captain Crunch.

 

Georges El Masri 

Captain Crunch. I haven't Captain Crunch in a while. I know. Right, but it's good. What's the flavour like again? It's the little it's the French Toast Crunch. All shaped like little French toast? crunch. That french toast covered in. That isn't that French Toast Crunch? Captain Crunch. Captain Crunch is different. No, they're little toast ones. They are.

 

Luc Boiron 

Yeah,

 

Georges El Masri 

I used to have that all the time. I think I mean, I don't eat cereal often. I have Cheerios at home. But yeah, so fruit loops are good, too. I like the kind of sweet, sweet sugary stuff. Yeah. Okay, what about your favourite movie?

 

Luc Boiron 

Maybe avatar. I really enjoyed that sun theatre and enjoyed it quite a bit.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay. What would you prefer Power Rangers or Powerpuff? girls?

 

Luc Boiron 

I guess Power Rangers.

 

Georges El Masri 

Why do you say that?

 

Luc Boiron 

I can't say I've watched much of either one. But you know,

 

Georges El Masri 

because you're a guy.

 

 

Yeah, I guess since I'm a guy, you know, Power Rangers is Yeah, more action. I guess they're both action-oriented. One is more feminine. So yeah.

 

Georges El Masri 

I used to watch the Powerpuff Girls and it was cool. I used to watch both. But yeah. All right.  What was your favourite band or artist when you were younger?

 

Luc Boiron 

Oh, man. You know, the first tape I ever had back on cassette tapes. was trying to think, was it. The Spice Girls? I think it was me to back Yeah. I had a CD though. Not a tape. Oh, I had it was a persona. That was when they were selling them both on CDs and tape. Yeah, get the other one. And I had a tape player at home. So so funny. My favourite band. I guess might have been Green Day. Every day.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. Spice Girls to Green Day. Yeah, quite different. Yeah. But yeah, I think everyone. When you're young, you just start off with the Spice Girls. Yeah. And then you branch out huge. Yeah, we were growing up. Yeah, I think we're around the same age. So I think I don't know. How old are you? I'm 29. Oh, 28. Perfect. Yeah, we are almost the same. That's cool. Okay.  And I you already answered this question. It was one of mine, which was where would you like to retire? But maybe we'll shift it. Where's? Where will you go next to your vacation?

 

Luc Boiron 

Well, probably back to the Canary Islands. But other than that, yeah. I just came back from the Cook Islands. We got a cheap flight deal. And it's the middle of nowhere in the South Pacific. So it was beautiful. Just came back in September. Oh, and I'm going to San Diego tomorrow. Oh, it's not really a conference. I'm going to a flipping conference. Really? Yeah, there's one every year called flip hacking live. I've never been but I'm expecting great things. And I have a brother and my brother and his family live in Los Angeles and Orange County. So they're only about an hour hour and a half from San Diego.

 

Georges El Masri 

Do you think that until you hit traffic?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yes. But I'm gonna see them. So today's Tuesday that we're recording this I'm leaving tomorrow morning Wednesday. And the conference runs until Saturday so Sunday they're coming down San Diego and we're gonna go probably to the zoo or something like that. So I guess a mini-vacation gets saved my you know, cute little niece and nephew.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. Is it your first time in San Diego?

 

Luc Boiron 

No, because my brother lives there. I've been a few times actually. The Cook Islands. The flight to Rarotonga and Cook Islands flies through la So back in September, I was in Los Angeles and we went down to the San Diego SeaWorld, so Oh, it was there pretty recently, actually.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, he's got you said he's got, kids. Right. So they probably like doing SeaWorld and stuff like that.

 

Luc Boiron 

Seasons pass. Oh, yeah. So yeah.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. Cool. Well, Have a safe flight. That's it. Was there anything you want to add? And do you want to tell people how they could contact you?

 

Luc Boiron 

Yep. If you want to contact me, probably email is the best way. So my name it's Lucb@cashhousebuyer.ca. So the buyer of houses for cash house buyer.ca. Yeah, email me reach out to me like that. That's probably the best way. And you can also find me on Facebook. Look for on Luc Boiron, you're on and? And I'm on BiggerPockets. And Instagram at French Luke.

 

Georges El Masri 

You're on bigger pockets, the podcast?

 

Luc Boiron 

No, I'm on bigger pockets, the forum? Oh, find me if you search in the forums got it. But actually, I don't check that often. So emails the best way, you know, yeah, I mean, Facebook, or Instagram as well.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. I've never listened to bigger pockets, but I've heard people talking about it. Alright. And just to be clear, I guess if people have a distressed home or something, they can contact you. And you would help them get through to the next step. Absolutely. I was looking to buy more houses, even if they have a lead for it. And actually, the first referral that we're going to be paying someone on for having brought us, you know, a seller who's potentially interested in selling so I always look for more properties. And if someone has a deal that they want to partner on, if they're not sure how to do it, but they got a great opportunity. I'm happy to do that as well.

 

Luc Boiron 

Cool. Sounds good. Well, thank you for your time, Luke. Thank you, George.

 

Georges El Masri 

Thanks for listening to this episode of The Wall podcast. If you enjoy the content, then I would appreciate it if you shared it with your family and friends and anyone you know who may benefit until next time. I'm Georgia mastery. Enjoy the rest of your day.

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Georges El Masri

Georges El Masri

Toronto born, I spent my early childhood in Mississauga. My passion is to help your family become "well off" through real estate investing. I always work with the idea that your needs come first and I'm here to guide you. You can trust that my opinion will be a genuine one! I look forward to connecting with you soon if we haven't already.