Police Sergeant to Full Time Real Estate Professional with Adrian Pannozzo

Police Sergeant to Full Time Real Estate Professional with Adrian Pannozzo

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Police Sergeant to Full Time Real Estate Professional with Adrian Pannozzo transcription and audio link.

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Adrian Pannozzo 

Welcome to the Well Off Podcast where the goal is to motivate, inspire and share success principles. I'm here with Adrian Pannozzo, who is a retired Sergeant with the Peel Regional Police. I believe you have worked with them for 21 years. And I know you were born or maybe not born, but you were raised in Barrie. Right?  I was raised in the north part of Toronto, New Market King City area. Okay.

 

Georges El Masri 

So not Barrie?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Not Barry, south of Barrie. Yeah, I read that somewhere. So they had the wrong information. All right. And I know you again, correct me if I'm wrong, but started investing in Acton? No, I actually started investing. My first one was in New Market. Wow. And then from there, everything went towards Hamilton. Okay, I'm gonna find the article where they put all that false information because I took it off the net, the internet, sorry. And I know, like you just mentioned, you're in Hamilton now. So you do a lot of joint ventures and multi-unit type of properties. I know a little bit about what you do. But if you want to describe that, just to kick things off. Sure. So we started about seven years ago, we bought our first rental property close to where I live in the city of New Market. And we continue to aggressively invest in real estate throughout the years, a total of seven years now investing and we began to heavily invest in the City of Hamilton where cash flow if you've heard the expression, cash flow is king. Hamilton is very generous with respect to your return on investment and cash flow. So we continue to invest in invest more resources and funds into Hamilton and multifamily homes, particularly triplexes, four-plexes stuff like that. We moved on to that. And we began to joint venture with other investors who maybe not as up to speed on the Hamilton market may need some help on what kind of rents we can generate in certain areas of Hamilton, we can also look at essentially, different strategies around different areas and kind of rents we can generate in Hamilton, depending on the size of the apartments, the quality of finishing, so on and so forth. So we kind of really, really perfected our strategies in multifamily homes in Hamilton, especially incorporating the buy renovate and refinance stock strategy with multifamily homes. Yeah, yeah, I've seen some of the work that you've done. You do a good job of picking the right finishes for certain areas. So you don't want to spend too much but you know, how to spend just the right amount to make to get top rents and then exactly something look good. Exactly. So before we get into some of the details, I typically like to start off by asking you a bit about where you grew up. What was your childhood, like, if you want to tell us a bit about that? I grew up downtown St. Clair, in a different area of Toronto. Back then it was a very, it was predominantly a very Italian, Italian area. That's where I grew up as a kid. And that area is well it's changed quite a bit since I live downtown Toronto. But yeah, I grew up there. I went to school, downtown Toronto, kind of in the old Italian area of St. Clair and Dufferin. Pretty well stayed in that area till about grade nine. And then my parents and I moved from St. Clair and Dufferin area to more than the north end of the city, new market, Richmond Hill area. So do you remember why you moved out there? Why I moved out to Richmond Hill. My parents predominantly wanted to live, they wanted to move outside of the downtown core. And they wanted to live more in the suburbs. And just to have a little bit more of a house and a little bit more land a little bit more affordable, you know, as opposed to living. Some of the prices in Toronto are crazy. So I think that was the main reason why they decided to, you know, maybe come a bit further north and have their money go further in real estate. So, yeah, I think that was basically it.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. So coming out of high school. I guess you finished your high school degree in Richmond Hill, I'm assuming Yes. Yeah. And coming out of high school, was your plan always to be a sergeant or an officer?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Ever since I was like in grade one. Really. I always wanted to be a police officer. And I mean, I was like to think I was successful in that I, I had a very good career. I got to work in many different areas of the police department, Homicide Bureau, bank robbery division, Drug Squad. I worked in. Yeah, a bunch of different areas within the police department. So I had a great career. enjoyed every second of it, but it was time to move on. Great. So you were 23? Was it when you started? Correct? 23 years old? Yes.

 

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Georges El Masri 

What department? Did you start in then?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

patrol in a cruiser, you know, responding to 911 calls and everything like that.

 

Georges El Masri 

Great. Yeah. And I believe that your wife still works for the police force.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Yes. She works for the police department. She's a 911 dispatcher. Right? So, yeah, she really enjoys her job as well. And she's been that for I want to say 10 years now. 911 dispatcher? So? Yeah, quite a unique job as well. But yeah, it was time for me to move on. And my passion, you know, after 2020 years in, in policing, my passion kind of changed towards more into real estate. And I really found a passion for investing and, and doing things with my money in real estate. And I kind of got out of policing and the whole policing mentality and kind of transition to full-time real estate.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. So okay, well, I actually, I was speaking to an insurance agent recently. And it turns out that he had a really good friend who was a police officer, and he's working with you now. So I forgot his name. But it was kind of a small world, the fact that he mentioned your name, and, and he said he was going to be working with you in the future.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

But he's, he's an agent. He's an insurance agent. He's an insurance agent. Yeah. But that's, that's for a different time. I'll see if I can remember his name. It's on the tip of my tongue. Yeah. Yeah. But an insurance agent. Play? Yes. Yes.

 

Georges El Masri 

So maybe somebody had it for you to look at, I think

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

I know. I think I know who you're talking to. I think you're currently working with the police officer on a project in Hamilton at the moment. Yes, yeah. So it's Yes, in front of us. But anyway, okay. Okay. I got you. I'm trying to connect the dots.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. Okay. I noticed that there was a video of you on YouTube, doing like a little presentation about joint ventures and, and real estate investing. And it seemed like you were catering, or aiming to talk to you some of your former colleagues, police officers. Yeah. Have you done a lot of deals with your colleagues, or

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

you're just starting to now I never really had my former colleagues. I didn't really ever promote myself that I was a real avid real estate investor because I kind of kept that part of my life. Kind of to myself, when I was in the police department didn't really go around letting a lot of people know how deeply entrenched I was in real estate. Yeah, until I finally resigned and retired. But prior to that, nobody really knew. You know how deep I was in my estate. They just thought that I may be owned by one or two houses. Yeah, that's it. But yeah, I'm more comfortable now to talk about it and kind of let them know where I am with my career in real estate.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. And at this point, you have what 32 properties now?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

A 33 return on another one. Yeah. So I think we're up to 33. Now,

 

Georges El Masri 

yeah, yeah. When you were in the police force, how did you first decide that you wanted to invest in real estate?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

My mortgage broker, my mortgage broker at the time, also had his real estate license. And he convinced me, he's like, Well, you know, you have all this equity in your home, what we should do something with that, like, it's just sitting there. Let's use that equity to make more money, and invest, invest in real estate. And that's exactly what we did. So he kind of steered me down the path, but the idea in my head, then we started off by taking a home equity loan, using the equity we had in our house. And using that, I think we started off with 150 or $200,000, he locks and we use that to purchase our first two or three properties. Two or three, you're able to get two or three with 150. Back then, I think because, you know, they were probably in the area of 350. So 20% of 350 70. You know, times two or three? Yeah, I want to say was between 150 and 200. He locked that we were able to get to kind of start our investing Really? So

 

Georges El Masri 

yeah. Well, I know that a lot of high-level investors now. They typically say that you're not really able to live off the income that you're generating from the properties you need to have something on the side that you're doing. Do you find that now that you're retired, I know your wife's generating an income are you kind of getting by on your day to day stuff through your wife's income? Are you able to survive from your rental income? I'm both

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

I also like you already know, I'm also a real estate agent as well. So I can generate an income through the sale of real estate, most of my properties all cash flow. So there's money coming every month from the various properties Whether I own them on my own, or whether we're a joint venture, but they all cash flow. So there's money every month coming from properties as well in the form of cash flow. So I think when you combine my real estate salary as far as sales go, and you combine that with monthly cash flow, I am doing okay. Why did you decide to become a real estate agent? passion, I like real estate a lot. I like to sell real estate. I like to help people that are getting into it and kind of, you know, pick my brain for my expertise in the stuff that I've done over seven years. And it's a good feeling to know that you're helping somebody that shares the same interests as you. And you know, you may bounce like one thing you know, as well, George's I do. Networking in real estate is huge. And, you know, the power of networking in this business is incredible. And if you're able to network, I mean, you could pick up so many things from just colleagues that have the same mindset, like, Hey, I tried that, or we did that. And you know, we ended up cash flowing this much. And we invested in that project. And it's amazing, really, like, I found a passion for it, and just being able to talk to people like yourself, and we bounce things off each other. It's pretty cool. And you can learn so much just from talking to somebody and share your ideas and stuff like that. So overall, I'm definitely very motivated and in real estate investing, and it's definitely been fruitful for me.

 

Georges El Masri 

So can you give a few examples of networking events that you might attend or any form of networking that you're involved in,

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

um, I've attended some obviously, myself and my, my part my business partner Sandy have with Mackay Realty, we've put on some investor events that you're familiar with, and that you've done yourself here with your, your real estate office. Yeah, um, so you're no stranger to that, I think you have a lot of knowledge as well. So I mean, here's a prime example of networking, where, you know, you and I are talking about the same thing, essentially just on a different may be on a different scale. But overall, we have the same concepts. And you may know, you know, a trick of the trade that you'd share with me, or vice versa. I've been to some rock star events as well, they're, you know, obviously extremely knowledgeable. And I enjoy going to those, we do a few investor events ourselves. I've been to a few of your investor seminars as well. So it's nice to take away some stuff from your circle in your office as well that we can bring home to our offices and kind of grow with that. So great. And you obviously have a lot of knowledge, you've got a Do you have a lot of joint venture partners? Or is there like a small handful that you typically work with? I want to say there's probably eight to 10 knocks, probably a maybe a dozen, really eight to 12 different joint venture partnerships that I'm currently involved in. I want to say yeah, solid eight, eight to 10. And then there's always the networking through the sale of real estate to And that, again, you just don't think you can put the price or a number on how valuable networking is. Yeah, it really is. And I'm sure you know that being in the business, even just through leads through real estate leads that you can get and you know, and I'm talking to a guy and he may say, Hey, you know, I know a guy that's actually trying to sell a three-box or a four Plex multifamily and you never know right? And you being in the business, you would know that Yeah. your partner's now I know you you're doing a bit or at least one deal with a police former police or a police officer now. Yeah. And you plan on doing more deals with your colleagues or your former colleagues. Yeah, absolutely. And I think, you know, I bring a lot to the table as far as experience and I can give them advice. And, you know, in the police world, most cops like to deal with other cops or most cops only trust other cops and they just, you're kind of tainted and I've been in that world because I was a police officer for you know, 21 years. So I think the more they feel more at ease when they're dealing with another police officer and the more in a situation where you can gain their trust a little bit easier and a little bit quicker. So overall, I mean, if you build that trust with police officers are great clients because they have typically they have great credit and they have banks loved to lend them money, same as firemen and nurses and stuff like that because they have Have that pension, they have that stable income. Yeah, they have all that as opposed to somebody who's like, you know, self-employed, and they don't have the benefits of, you know, having that in their corner. But it's not the end of the world, but it definitely helps. I would think so. And do police officers get special mortgage rates? No, no, because I think in the States, certain people like teachers and such they get a better mortgage rate than Yeah, no, we don't. Yeah, we don't.

 

Georges El Masri 

Just out of curiosity, what was it like working as a police officer? Is it like a really tight community? Or very tight? Yeah, and everyone kind of looks out for each other. But what's the atmosphere like, between your colleagues,

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

like a brotherhood like, um, you know, like, you can imagine how you would think, you know, it is a brotherhood, and, you know, at the end of the day, you really, you really have you really watch each other's back, especially if you're running into a very hostile situation, you know, you know, we may not like each other that much, but either way, we're going in together, and we got to come out together to that situation. So overall, it's Yeah, it's, it's, it's a different world. It's a brotherhood. And really, 21 years later, now, I don't really miss all that. I don't really miss policing all that much. I miss the Brotherhood, of being a police officer and having those friendships and each other's back. Because at the end of the day, let's face it, if we're selling real estate, sales are sales. Right? It's pretty cutthroat. You sell. You sell great. You don't sell so well. Right? It's just, it's that's sales are black and white. Right? Yeah. So, but I missed the Brotherhood of policing and the strong friendships I made over the years that, you know, I was in that line of work. So,

 

Georges El Masri 

so do you think that you're trying to rekindle some of those relationships to get that feeling back of that brotherhood that you had in those relationships?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

With real estate? Yeah, potentially, with some investors. But I mean, again, if we're just, it's not, it's still different, it's completely different. You still build good relationships and estate that you network, that you help clients, you help them find great cash flowing properties? It is, it's still great to build those friendships. But the closeness of you and the other police officer, you in the Brotherhood are different. It's different.

 

Georges El Masri 

But what have you taken from your experience as an officer for 21 years? What have you brought from that into your new career?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

The ability to really negotiate the ability to really talk to people and just talk to people have them, confide in me have them trust me, be extremely, extremely comfortable talking to different people that I've never met before. And try to convince them that or try to educate slash convinced that, you know, we're the right people. This is the right strategy. Real Estate Investing is amazing. And maybe having maybe the right word is the gift of the gab, being able to just comfortably talk in front of audiences and educate different people on real estate investing. I think for the most part, and I'm sure that there is an element of trust that exists when you approach someone that doesn't know you very well, and you say, I was an officer for 21 years, there's got to be some sort of, yeah, trust there. And there's also on the flip side, not a lot of people, you can be a great person, and you can be great potential, you know, real estate investor, but not everybody likes the police. Yeah. And, you know, there's somewhat tainted, and it could be 5050. Right, sometimes, you know, it works to your advantage that they let their guard down because you're a police officer. And then on the flip side, sometimes, depending on the person on the other side of the fence, it actually would be considered a negative. Yeah, that they, they just have that stigma that, oh, you're a police officer, you know, you must be this, you must be that. And it actually is a bad thing. Yeah. Why do you think people have that idea, but like, certain people have that idea about police officers? Maybe it's been ingrained in them and their cultural thing from their family, you know, just growing up and their whole family, the way their family and the way their family looks at police or talks about the police or just their upbringing, you know, and there, maybe their teenage years, you know, as they can remember back to their teenage years and how they always got in trouble and how, you know, just the whole police thing gives them a bad taste in their mouth.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, yeah. Or they know someone who had a bad experience. Exactly. Yeah.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Yeah. And then oh, everybody's got a story, right? Yeah. So

 

Georges El Masri 

if you could just very quickly can you tell me what your day you still look like as an officer Sir compared to now as an investor and as an agent,

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

it's less regimented. Obviously, working in the police department, your schedule is very regimented. You know, you're different than, you know, in real estate, we still have a schedule to adhere to, because I mean, we need to do certain things like, follow-ups, potentially door knocking, whatever, whatever just makes helps make that sale. Right. So you have to, and I think I lost my train of thought there but

 

Georges El Masri 

or campaign comparing the two between being an officer and

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

but yeah, you're very, very much more regimented. You know you got to be on a roll call at 6 am. Yeah, no excuses. They don't care if it's a snowstorm. 6 am is a roll call, period, you know, that's just the paramilitary attitude, you will be on time no matter what, that's just the way it is,

 

Georges El Masri 

what is a typical day look like for you, now,

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

I can start my day, you know, at 9 am, I can start my day at 12 noon, but at the end of the month, you know, you have the complete freedom to do whatever you want, you know, but at the end of the day, it's, you know, your sales that month is going to be indicative of how you're working, right. So, really, it's hard to say every day is going to be the same. But obviously, you if you set yourself up and in a particular routine, it would be a lot easier to stick to a regimented routine, like, you know, this is what I do with my clients on Mondays and Tuesdays and I try to, you know, recruit or maybe work it for more, try to recruit more, more business. But I don't have you know, it's not like I say, Mondays are my door-knocking days. And, you know, Wednesdays are my cold calling days. Yeah, you know what I mean? I typically don't have that regiment in my schedule. So it's kind of different. Long story short, I drive, I start my day when I want to start my day, and I can work till 10 pm if I want, or I can work till 1 pm if I want, obviously, the harder we work and the more hours we put in the more follow-ups and, and strategic stuff that we have planned to, you know, obviously drum up business, for it's producing or dot results, it's producing results, right? So,

 

Georges El Masri 

right, and as an officer, you obviously have to be in good shape, do you find that you've maintained your shape, are you still working out like you used to?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Pretty much, I'm not lifting a lot of heavyweights anymore. I'm more, I'm doing more, more reps with lighter weight, just because I'm getting older too. But yeah, for the most part, I'm trying my best to stay in shape, which is a lot easier on the police department. Because obviously, you're working out every day. And before you're going to work and whatnot, in this line of work, it's easy to kind of get in the bad habit, and not work out every day. But overall, you know, I still try to stay in shape and stuff like that, for sure.

 

Georges El Masri 

Good. And what is your wife think about the whole transition you've made from having like a secure full-time job into going into something that's a lot riskier and less, less predictable.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Overall, what is my wife Think about it, she loves the fact that I'm, Believe it or not, I'm actually home more. There are days, you know, two days in a row, I don't have to leave the house if I don't want to, I can work from home, I can make my calls from home and my follow-ups and all that stuff. So she likes the flexibility of that. And really, she's there just to support him. And she's like, you know if this is what you want, and it's obviously lucrative or can be lucrative, and you're you like what you're doing a lot. And you know, you're getting great feedback from your clients, and you're closing a lot of deals. Everything's hunky-dory. Yeah. And has your quality of life increased, since you decided to commit yourself more towards your investments? I work just as hard Believe it or not. But the difference is the work I'm putting in, completely turns around and benefits me whether it's lucrative. You know, I sold 10 houses this month, for example, let's just say or, you know, if I want to work so hard and sell 15 houses in one month. It's going to me, you know what I mean? It's not like, if I catch 15 bad guys today, it's not like I'm going to put an extra $3,000 this month in my pocket, right? It's the police's salary, you know unless you work typically some overtime, but normally you have your salary. And it's different, like with sales, right? Yeah, you could make a lot more money in sales.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. Well, it sounds like your quality of life at the moment is being determined by your real estate income, your sales income. Are you seeing the fruits of the labour of the investments right now? Or is it more of like, you're just letting it flourish on its own and grow and then over time, it'll become something that you can

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

benefit from I have let it grow, like fruits of the labours, you would say, you know, all of my properties essentially have, I've had in my portfolio for six years, say on average, five to six years. And most of most, if not all of them have almost doubled in value. from six years ago. I was buying turnkey triplexes, six years ago for, you know, 340,000, where they're now worth over 600,000. Yeah, for sure. And again, that's just the power of real estate. Right? So overall, yeah, we've we, we haven't really taken much money at all, if any out of our capital in these properties, we've just let it sit and continue to grow. So yeah, it's done well, very well, and like to say, you know, most of my properties are almost worth double than when I first bought them six years ago, I think I think we're doing okay, for sure. So,

 

Georges El Masri 

do you only invest in real estate, because I've, I went to an event recently, and a very, very successful investor told me to start looking into other types of investments like he's interested in selling stock options? For example, he's got a huge portfolio, but he's starting to pull out some of his real estate money and put into stock options. Sell. Okay. Do you invest in anything else? And have you ever considered diversifying your portfolio?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

I've considered it Have I done it? No. Why? I've been extremely successful in real estate. And I haven't had a need, or a strong desire to go invest in stocks or, you know, some other thing than real estate, predominantly. Yeah, I've just and maybe it's not a good idea. Because, you know, I'm kind of one of those guys that, you know, puts all his eggs in one basket. Yeah, right now, so probably not the best idea in the world. But I would say, I definitely fall under, I got all my eggs in one basket.

 

Georges El Masri 

Great. Just to switch things up. I want to ask, what would be your biggest goal right now? Or maybe not even right? Now, let's just say in general, what would be your biggest goal, what's the biggest goal you ever thought about accomplishing?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

the biggest goal would be to have a real estate team that three, you know, potentially three times bigger than what we have now. Something like the size of this business, for example, have a team that, you know, there's essentially the size of this team, that would be my, my goal is to continue to educate myself continue to know more continue to learn more, but ultimately, build a bigger, stronger team within our office as well, right? Are you focused more on your real estate sales side of things growing your team there? Or are you spending more time focusing on growing your portfolio of properties? At this point, right now, I would say it's more growing the team than my portfolio, I think my portfolio is very strong, considering I started seven years ago, very strong. So if I were to be given a choice, I'd say I'd like to put a lot more emphasis on growing the team. Why is that? We bought a building that we can house our team in. So I think we can definitely make use of the space. And, again, we purchased the building. So we are again, reinvesting in investing yesterday. It's not we're just you know, we're obviously trying to do the right thing and reinvest in rusty. And obviously being agents, probably totally comfortable doing that, as opposed to saying, hey, George, you know, let's put 60,000 in the stock market. Most of my clients don't like that. So, all right. And do you ever plan on retiring? And if so, when would you want to do that? I'd like to retire. I mean, if everything continues to go to plan, I'd like to retire by the time. You know, I'm 52. Okay, I would love to complete, you know, retire. And so in eight years. I'm 44. Yeah. Yeah.

 

Georges El Masri 

Probably closer to 50 2026. Oh, even before then. What? Do you want to retire by then?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Oh, yeah. Like, ideally, Max, I'd like to retire is by 50.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. So 2026 I believe.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

We're What? 2014 Oh, wait, no, 20 2018? Yeah, yeah. Wow. Okay, and you're, you're gonna do that? Will you have some sort of residual income from the team? Or is that going to be you're going to count on your properties at that point? I think, for the most part, I'm going to concentrate on my properties at that point. Yes. Continue to sell real estate, obviously, on the team. But I mean, I think if I went really, really, really aggressively and work my butt off in the next four years, four to five years, that would take us to you know, 50 overall Yeah, I think I would just, I wouldn't burn my time, I would just definitely put it towards more real estate.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay, what 10 years ago? Do you think you would have been able to retire at 50? No, no. When did you start believing that that was possible?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

When did I start? That's a good question. Probably within the last two to three years, because I saw the properties beginning to accumulate, saw the cash flow coming in, continue to get more, you know, more people wanting to a joint venture. So overall, did I think that would happen? No. I look back now. Definitely grateful that I did for sure. So what do you think is your greatest personality trait? I would say I'm very competent. I'm very focused. I'm very dedicated. I can be very serious at times. But at the end of the day, you know, I get the job done. I don't I'm not a kind of guy that pussyfoot around, you know, this has got to be done. Let's get it done. sort of speak. So, overall, yeah, I want to say we're, we're definitely more aggressive than your average. Okay. Let me just kind of, you know, I'm saying,

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, so for sure. And sort of along those lines in some way, what has been your greatest success so far?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

My best success in real estate or just in general,

 

Georges El Masri 

let's just say in general, we'll leave it open.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

On a business level, I say one of my best successes were that we JV on a project, and we essentially got all of our money out. Plus 80,000. So we were like, super, super ecstatic about that.

 

Georges El Masri 

Was that a fourplex? Yes, and the JV is a joint venture for those who don't know. Yeah. So that was that a recent project?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

last year? 2017? Yeah, that's pretty good. Yeah, that was a note. What do you owe plus any? What do you do with that money? When you? Well, we typically reinvested it reinvested, you know, you keep

 

Georges El Masri 

a reserve fund on the side for those properties, because I know you, you typically, like totally got these properties. So everything's brand new, but you still set money aside, just in case something goes wrong.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Probably wouldn't be a bad idea to keep a little nest egg there, just in case, you know, let's just say all of a sudden, you know, the furnace and the AC both, you know, go could put on the same day. Yeah, you know, there's potential $7,000 of expenses, right? Potentially, if not, maybe six, but, you know, a brand new furnace, a brand new hot water tank, so to speak. So, yeah, it definitely can add up. So maybe that's a good idea. Yeah. Right. So after, like, if you if you're able to withdraw or get an additional ad after you refinance, maybe put some like 10 grand on the side. Just keep it for that property? Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. Okay. Well, we'll jump into the next section here, which is the random five, I kind of warned you about this on the random fire. Five. So just let me know what comes to mind as soon as you hear the question. And the first one is if you weren't a police officer or real estate investor, what would you be? If I wasn't a real estate investor or police officer or a police officer? If I wasn't a police officer or real estate investor, what would I be? Probably a fireman. Yeah. Okay. Everybody loves firemen. Yeah. As I was there similar to police officers, they get all kinds of time off. Yeah, they run their you know, they do long shifts. Yeah, probably longer than police shifts. And overall, everybody loves a fireman. Oh, you're gonna get a lot of people chewing out firemen. Like, you know, they chew up the police. Right? Right. So probably a fireman. Okay, for the love that they get.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. Okay. What are you not very good at?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

I'm not good at construction. Believe it or not, I'm good at Project managing construction and all of our construction projects. But I'm not good at like, you know, physical. Yeah. Doing the physical construction. Yep. I don't know-how.

 

Georges El Masri 

Okay, fair enough. What was the happiest moment of your life?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

the birth of my daughter. Right. Do you just have one? Yes. Yeah. Yeah. She's just turned 18. Yeah, believe it or not, but yeah, it was probably the best day of my life. So she's going off to college or Guelph, or wealth going off to Guelph

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. Does she know what she wants to do?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

She's studying at a golf University. Psychology. Psychology wants a master's in psychology. Well, good for her.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah. All right. So this is kind of a totally random question. But would you go with Bugs Bunny or Tom and Jerry,

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Tom and Jerry and Tom and Jerry.

 

Georges El Masri 

Alright. And would you rather have pineapples or anchovies on your pizza?

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

anchovies. anchovies. Yeah, really. I'm not a pineapple on pizza kind of guy. I'm more of Italian anchovies kinda pizza.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, but I was always under the impression that pizza wasn't really tiny. It's like something that they created in the States.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Yeah, I don't know about that, I guess and say, Yeah, it sounds right. But I don't really know. Yeah. So we need somebody who's got some Italian History Background. Right. Okay, great. So to end things here, do you want to? Is there anything you want to share? You want to talk about how people can reach you if they have questions or anything of that sort? Yeah. So I can be reached at Adrian at McKay spelled McKay realty network.com. Just flip me an email. I'm always open to chatting and networking with other investors, I'm not looking to push anybody into real estate investing or whatnot. I'm just more of someone who that I think, could be used as a resource. In real estate investing. Definitely, an very, very knowledgeable, but yet very person that really believes in real estate, I'm trying to find a specific word, but I can't seem to put my finger on it. All right. But overall, know if I can give anybody advice. jump in with both feet. If you've been contemplating on, you know, investing in real estate, jump in with both feet, there's no time like the present. Like they always say, you know, it's not about timing the market, it's about time in the market, you should, you know, get in the market, get off the fence, start investing in real estate, you're definitely going to be happy with the results, and capitalize on that there's no time like the present. I really think that I truly believe in investing in real estate and financial freedom through real estate that it could cause

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, why don't you think more people are investing? It seems like there's a lot of people that don't have investment properties, it's a pretty substantial percentage of the population that they just don't own any real estate or investment properties.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Right. And your question is, why do I think they don't invest? One, they don't have capital? Two, they have bad credit. Three, those are those people that will always sit on the sidelines and always look and say shit, I can never do that. You know, I can never invest in that. Because, you know, I just can't take that risk. And they don't really know what the risk is because they haven't come out of their circle yet. without, you know, scaring, you know, being scared that Yeah, what's gonna happen to me? Am I gonna lose my shirt? Am I gonna lose? You know, every penny I ever own? Meanwhile, it's the other way around. So it's kind of different. But no, overall, we're very happy.

 

Georges El Masri 

Yeah, well, I think for those people that are scared, one thing they should do is surround themselves with other investors. And you'll just automatically get the confidence it'll, it'll just kind of be transferred over to and that's the first step and then educate yourself read books and, and things will come together for you.

 

Adrian Pannozzo 

Absolutely. I completely agree. Mm-hmm.

 

Georges El Masri 

Great. Okay. Well, thank you very much, Adrian, appreciate your time. Yep. And as always nice chatting with you and we'll talk again soon. Cool. Thank you. Thanks for listening to this episode of The Wall podcast. If you enjoy the content, then I would appreciate it if you shared it with your family and friends and anyone you know who may benefit until next time. I'm George El Masri. Enjoy the rest of your day.


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Georges El Masri

Georges El Masri

Toronto born, I spent my early childhood in Mississauga. My passion is to help your family become "well off" through real estate investing. I always work with the idea that your needs come first and I'm here to guide you. You can trust that my opinion will be a genuine one! I look forward to connecting with you soon if we haven't already.